New Milk on the Block

“Where does cheese come from?” The answer is milk! Every (dairy) cheese must come from a mother’s milk. But there are so many incarnations of milk on the market that the true source can get obscured.  

Bethel Creamery's address is on Happy Avenue in Swan Lake, NY

Milk can be pasteurized, homogenized, stripped of natural sugars, and labeled under so many names. After having drunk incognito skim milk for most of my life and now even lactose-free milk, I forgot what actual milk tasted like. It is luscious! Imagine dipping your spoon into melt-away sweet ice cream or letting a pat of butter soften on your tongue. That is the beauty of real milk, just like it came out of the udder.

The bad news is that really tasty milk, especially kosher/cholov yisroel/organic/local/family farm milk, can be expensive. This Bethel Creamery milk cost me $5.99 for a half gallon at Pomegranate in Brooklyn. It’s pricy, but it is home grown. It comes from up the road in the Catskills and is organic with no added hormones.

Details on the farm, though no nutritionals. Whole milk averages around 150 calories per cup with 8g of fat and 8g of protein.

The Jersey and Holstein cows get to eat actual grass and participate in normal cow activities like wandering around in fields and mooing.  

 It is also no surprise that whole milk is also fattier than low fat and skim; it runs about 8g of fat per cup and 150 calories. The good news is that full milk is so flavorful, you only need a touch to get your “milk fix.” I didn’t even crave sugar on my cereal because the milk was sweet enough, and I was satisfied after only a quarter cup. If you are lucky, a cream line may show up at the top of the jug.  

The Franklin family at Bethel is shomer shabbos.

A little dab'll do ya. This milk is so rich, you just need a touch.

Everybody gets to have a milk break on shabbos—even the cows.

Elizabeth Bland
The Cheese Mistress
www.kcheese.com (kosher only)
www.cheesemistress.com (all cheeses)

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This entry was posted in Cheese Reviews, Cooking and Cheesemaking, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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